Newsletter 45: May 2009

Up and Coming for Submission

Until his death in 2005, after 33 years on the Supreme Court (19 as chief justice), William Rehnquist waged a quiet, constant and ultimately successful battle to mold the court into his conservative image.  He spoke explicitly about his efforts only once, to John A. Jenkins, an award-winning reporter for the New York Times Magazine. The result was a 1985 cover story, “The Partisan,” that revealed Rehnquist’s demagogic past and brought unwelcome attention to the justice, who vowed never again to cooperate in such an endeavor. Now, more than two decades after his history-making piece about the future chief justice, Jenkins returns to the scene with REHNQUIST: A PARTISAN LIFE, which will stand as the definitive biography of the most influential, and least understood, chief justice in the court’s modern era.  From beginning to end, Jenkins probes the origins of Rehnquist’s conservatism back to his school and family in Milwaukee; shows Rehnquist’s hand as a young justice intent on approving the death penalty and slowing the spread of abortion rights; and draws vivid pictures of Rehnquist’s presiding role in Bill Clinton’s impeachment trial and decisive role in George Bush’s first presidential victory. Currently President and Publisher of the leading political science textbook and reference publisher, CQ Press, Jenkins will take readers behind the scenes as he plans a final confrontation with the most fascinating and important judicial figure of our time.

Alison Sweeney hosts the hugely popular NBC reality show The Biggest Loser, seen by 10 million viewers each week. And she plays fan favorite bad girl Sami Brady on Days of Our Lives. She’s also a mom—to son Ben, age 4, and daughter Megan, who was just born in January. As a busy working mother, Alison knows it isn’t easy for new mommies to find time to take care of themselves—to get back in shape, eat right, exercise, maintain a beauty routine, stay stylish, and de-stress. But she also knows how important it is—for everyone in the family—for moms to look and feel good. With her signature warmth and humor, Alison is going to help them do it, realistically, affordably, and easily in THE MOMMY DIET. Written with veteran lifestyle writer Christie Matheson, the book will feature fantastic, proven strategies for staying healthy during pregnancy and losing weight sensibly after the baby is born. It also offers readers the fitness, beauty, fashion, and self-care plans they need during and after pregnancy. With access to Hollywood’s top trainers, dieticians, stylists, and spas, Alison will share their expert tips, routines, shortcuts, and secrets—the ones that have really worked for her and her hectic lifestyle—in an easy-to-follow format that guides readers through the three trimesters of pregnancy and the first nine months after the baby is born.

If you think you’ve heard everything about Bernie Madoff and his $65 billion Ponzi scheme, you haven’t—not yet anyway. Among the many that were caught up in the most ruinous ploy Wall Street has ever seen were the moneyed and privileged of Florida’s ritzy Palm Beach. THE GOLDEN FLEECED: HOW MADOFF SWINDLED PALM BEACH will uncover why this elite group; among the richest, savviest, and most arrogant people in the nation, became easy marks for Madoff’s worldwide con. Sharon Geltner, award-winning journalist and veteran publicist and fund raiser for Jewish charities in Palm Beach County will offer an insider’s perspective into the Madoff story. Her expose will scrutinize the super-rich in their unguarded moments in the money trenches of the opulent island resort town offering both anthropological and financial insights into the privileges, perks, and senses of entitlement that made them susceptible to the biggest swindle in recent history.

For Kate Bracy, a freelance medical writer who has written prescriptive books for menopausal women and for sexually healthy everybodies, there are so many kinds of love and so little time. As a nurse practitioner she has looked at love from both sides – from the top and the bottom of the gyn exam table. For years she has advised others on ways to stay healthy, enjoy sex, and survive the hormone rollercoaster – adolescence through menopause. And yet it was her own experience with love that prompted a dissection of “limerence” as a force in her life and that of almost everyone she knows. THAT CRAZY LITTLE THING: FIELD NOTES ON LOVING is the memoir of a decade that starts when Kate falls in love with her boss.  We follow her move to rainy Seattle; a stint in the local jail as a nursing supervisor; observe her almost breakup with her longtime partner; ride along on a mildly murderous trip to Ireland with her daughters; and finally, watch a reunion with the boss (eight years later) that leaves her dizzy and breathless. At no time does she leave her beloved partner, and at no time does she let herself – or us – off the hook. Her humor ambushes us at every turn, and her quest for spiritual and emotional balance is an unforgettable ride through love, longing, bisexuality, parenting and middle age, seen through the captivating lens of Kate’s aching heart and twinkling wry eye.

Aram Saroyan was 21 in 1965. He knew Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, and William Burroughs. He had the opportunity to experience the power of the music of the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, and Bob Dylan. He entered adulthood at a time of cultural turmoil that, by turns, surprised, heartened, frightened, and ultimately sustained him. At the same time he was participating in the social and cultural upheaval, Aram had come to know significant players in the “parent culture” through his family. His father was William Saroyan. Walter Matthau was his stepfather. His parents’ friends included Gloria Vanderbilt, Richard Avedon, Jack Lemmon, and Oona Chaplin. With SIXTIES KID, Saroyan takes a look at the decade from a privileged position, well-placed to explore both sides of the generation gap of the day. An internationally known poet, novelist, biographer, and playwright, Saroyan will provide unique insights into a decade that proved to be a historical switch point but which remains severely underreported by those who knew it best.

The Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints has been notorious for more than a century. Though its core tenant of embracing multiple wives is illegal in every state, the sect flourished undeterred throughout the American west, Canada and Mexico, amassing enormous wealth even as its membership subsisted on tens of millions of welfare dollars. The public saw FLDS victims only sporadically when they escaped the sect with terrible stories of incest, rape, young girls battered bloody for refusing to marry old men and even murder. Yet authorities intimidated by FLDS’s substantial block vote and fearful of becoming the target of religious bigotry accusations refused to act. It seemed FLDS was invincible, until Mark Shurtleff was elected Utah’s attorney general in 2000. A Mormon himself, Shurtleff engaged in no hand wringing over the religious rights of a sect he considered a criminal cult. Using dazzling legal maneuvers, audacious persuasion and plain brute force, Shurtleff faced down FLDS “blood oath” death threats and the powers of the status quo as he took the group apart piece by piece. His victories convinced the authorities in Arizona, Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, Nevada and even Canada that tackling FLDS did not have to be a pipe dream as they joined Shurtleff’s innovative and mostly legal crusade. Today FLDS’s $120 million trust has been seized and liquidated, its businesses auctioned off, its school districts and police forces dismantled, its property dispersed and its leaders jailed. In SHURTLEFF’S WAR, award winning journalist and author Debra Weyermann reveals the powerful, unknown story of a man who risked everything to do what was right. A legal thriller, a detective story and an action laced gambit, SHURTLEFF’S WAR is also the portrait of a complicated man who defied his own church and state government to put an end to a sect that has dotted American history with murder and scandal for 100 years.

As the national spokesperson for the Healthy Baby Begins with You campaign, best-selling author, producer, wife of director Spike Lee, and mother Tonya Lewis Lee has been on a mission to educate and promote a healthy lifestyle for women with the ultimate intention of enhancing the lives of our children. Through the campaign, she has reached thousands of people throughout the country spreading the word about maintaining good health with the help of exercise and dietary consciousness. Now Tonya has teamed up with celebrity chef, author and restaurateur, Alexander Smalls to create meals and menus that support convenient healthy eating habits and meal planning.  Through the use of easy, time saving techniques, the recipes are designed to offer good nutritional value and delicious alternatives for a hectic life. THE DAILY GRUB will function as a companion to women who are on the move, busy with their work lives and their families, who need a helpful suggestion about what to cook, what to buy at the grocery store and what to have in the cupboard. More than just a cookbook, it will encourage women to put their health and the health of their families first and offer practical insight, guidance and instruction to assist in making sound choices in everyday health care all the while making the daily grind just a little easier and a lot healthier.

Olu Dara, a cornet and trumpet player, performed and traveled with the industry’s jazz and blues greats–from Henry Threadgill, to Miles Davis, to Cassandra Wilson. He has worked as a dancer and writer, has scored music for dancer Diane McIntyre, and acted in the groundbreaking Broadway counterculture play, Hair. He has worked with musicians as diverse as Nona Hendryx, Bobby Womack, and Art Blakey and continues to perform to sold-out audiences around the world. His son, Nas, is considered by hip hop journalists, scholars, and fans alike, one of hip hop’s greatest lyricists. His classic debut, Illmatic, employed some of the most sophisticated jazz-rap producers around: Q-Tip, Pete Rock, DJ Premier, and Large Professor. The record ignited the moribund New York hip hop scene and paved the way for Biggie Smalls, Jay Z, and other New York City rappers. His reputation was built on his ability to write vivid and poetically intricate verses. But Nas hovered in the underground, getting turned down by industry bigwigs like Russell Simmons, and seemingly every other record company executive, for years before finally landing a deal with Columbia Records. Nine albums and a multi-million dollar career later, he is considered a legend in the music industry. BLUES TINGED BAYOUS AND HIP HOP COLORED BOULEVARDS by Ericka Blount Danois will pull readers into the staircases and apartments of the Queensbridge houses where Nas was raised and examine the history of the housing project and its social and political intentions. The lifestyle of residents in the Queensbridge projects in the ‘80s will contrast with the lifestyle of the residents of Natchez, the city where Olu was raised and the birthplace of the blues, in the 1940s, at the dawn of the great black migration North and a burgeoning Civil Rights Movement. A fascinating glimpse into the complex relationship and vastly different backgrounds between father and son, BLUES TINGED BAYOUS AND HIP HOP COLORED BOULEVARDS will delve into the personal narratives of the lives of two of the most revered musicians to come out of blues and hip hop and provide a deeper understanding of the political, social, economic and cultural conditions that created both genres.

When a massive earthquake rocked Los Angeles on February 9, 1971, the city was on edge. But there was a special anxiety plaguing Fairfax High School, an all-white, largely Jewish campus near the Hollywood Hills: Los Angeles High, an all-black school down the road, was demolished by the temblor and overnight its 3,000 students were bused to Fairfax High. Black and white kids who had rarely interacted before were suddenly sharing common ground, and faculty members were apoplectic at the thought of a racial powder keg exploding. But Marty Biegel, a 5’6″ fast-talking social studies teacher from New York, was ecstatic. An orthodox Jew, former Marine and frustrated jock, he had recently taken over coaching the Fairfax basketball team that no one else wanted. All of a sudden, Biegel had a gym filled with hugely talented athletes, and he began winning league championships. He became a hero on campus and developed a special bond with his players that would last over four decades. While his players began winning, blacks and whites at Fairfax High School were grappling with daily tensions. And Los Angeles, one of the nation’s most deeply segregated big cities, was jolted by a battle over mandatory school busing that would rival those in Boston, Cleveland and Detroit. In FAST BREAK AT FAIRFAX HIGH: A LOVE STORY ABOUT BASKETBALL AND BROTHERHOOD IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, Josh Getlin, a Los Angeles Times reporter for 30 years and former New York bureau chief, will not just recount the story of a charismatic coach and his improbable team, but also the seismic changes that came to Fairfax and Los Angeles itself in the decade that followed the earthquake. Packed with vivid human portraits and epic political struggles, this tale of a larger than life basketball coach, a high school that brought the races together and a big city in crisis has unmistakable resonance for our time.

From her first crush on the prettiest Mormon in fourth grade, to her stunning appearance in drag at the prom, Karelia Stetz-Waters was never like the other girls in the subdivision. The beautifully written SUBURBAN LOVE STORIES follows the author’s transformation from bashful child to outspoken, goth lesbian. Along the way, she considers sex with an extraterrestrial, hexes her lab partner’s science project, and finds her true calling as a poet who writes only about fog. Most importantly, she survives, stomping through adolescence unscathed, accompanied by her best friend, the mordant and ever-loyal Isabel Avila. Set against the backdrop of the most famous antigay political campaign of the 1990s, SUBURBAN LOVE STORIES is a tribute to the unexpected tolerance of small-town America, to youthful eccentrics, and to the people who protect them. Both hilarious and compassionate, it is a story about growing up human.

The siege of Belgrade in 1456 matched the most lopsided forces perhaps ever to be assembled against one another on a battlefield. In FORTRESS, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Jeff Brazil tells a captivating story of a history-altering medieval siege that is as unfamiliar as it is historically profound. It riveted both the royalty and the masses in both East and West and threw together as antagonists in a single, tragic moment three of the most extraordinary individuals of the middle millennium: Mehmed II, the brilliant Ottoman sultan whose army had routed Constantinople three years earlier; John Hunyadi, an Hungarian general beloved by commoners and whose courage and military abilities have been compared to those of Hannibal and Julius Caesar; and John Capistran, a 15th century lawyer-politician turned warrior-priest. The improbable turn of events that came to pass at the siege of Belgrade in the summer of 1456 caused a ripple effect in world history that resonates to this day in the politics and machinations of Eastern Europe and the Balkans. Moreover, the tragic story that unfolded there continues to reverberate in modern world affairs in the often sorrow-stained relations between Christians and Muslims around the globe. Cast in the mold of the successful pop history genre, FORTRESS contains all of the ingredients of a spellbinding medieval yarn – forbidden love, gallantry, knighthood, political intrigue and tragedy.

Years ago, New York food veterans Phil and Lauren Rubin took their family apple picking and encountered a common dilemma — what do you do with all those apples? The solution, they found, was right under their noses. The apple is nature’s finest study in versatility. It pairs well with all manner of vegetables, fruits, meats, offal, poultry, fish, shellfish, pastas, breads, and grains. It can be poached, roasted, pickled, grilled, candied, and just eaten whole. There are more than 2,000 varieties: from gnarled and rust-colored to smooth and bright green; honeysweet to sharply tart. The apple can be a meal’s central component or simply add a splash of flavor to a dish. And what is more comforting than coming in from the brisk weather for a warm slice of apple pie? Or as redolent of childhood as applesauce? In THE GREAT APPLE COOKBOOK, the Rubins will introduce us to contemporary preparations, from cider braised lamb shanks to green apple consommé. We crave wonderful taste and honor the ability to transform a simple product into something both flavorful and elegant. THE GREAT APPLE COOKBOOK will unveil how hundreds of ways to prepare an apple represents the essence of today’s food revolution.

Dunbar High, located in Washington, D.C., is a tough, tired and troubled inner city school whose students know very little of its illustrious roots. Dunbar was the first public high school for African-American students during a time when segregation was still very much intact. Today its approach could be seen as a model for modern education. Its students would break racial barriers and become pioneers in their fields. The school’s unique nature, from which a veritable academic utopia would be created, was the unintended consequence of controlling Jim Crow laws. In DUNBAR HIGH: A SCHOOL THAT CHANGED AMERICA, Alison Stewart will recount the story of the school that produced the greatest generation of African-Americans. Among Dunbar High’s graduates was the first black general in the Army, the first black Presidential cabinet member, the first black United States Senator after reconstruction, the first black graduate of the Naval Academy, the doctor who developed the blood bank, the attorney who argued against “separate but equal,”the current Congresswoman for Washington, D.C., the founder of the Ralph Lauren Cancer Center, and a host of others including the author’s parents. Stewart will give us an in-depth look at the inspirational graduates of Dunbar and the legacy of the high school that helped change America by creating an African-American intellectual class.

A man has killed once already and knows he will repeat the act.  His victims will seem random, but they share a common trait.  Each has beaten and abused a wife or girlfriend. Unaware of the killings that have begun is Terry McNair, a psychiatrist and sometime police adviser.  McNair is not a typical healer.  Aggressive, prone to violence and occasional excessive drinking, with a strong penchant for brief encounters with women, he is a contradiction.  But there is something else about McNair, a shadow that is not explained entirely by the darkness of his personal history.  There are echoes, wisps of thoughts and voices from those around him, constantly playing as he moves through the world.  He hears hints of what others are thinking or feeling, often as background noise but once in a while as clear and strident as someone shouting at the top of their lungs in an empty auditorium.  He does not understand it, almost does not believe it, but it is real. McNair is pulled into the string of killings when he is asked by the police for help in solving what appears to be a form of vigilante justice.  His involvement deepens when the husband of one of his patients is murdered.  The murders take on new meaning when the killer contacts McNair, launching a game of cat-and-mouse where it is not clear who is the hunter and who the hunted. A thrilling page-turner from start to finish, DARK ECHOES by Steve Winshel is a gripping read featuring a darkly complex protagonist you won’t soon forget.

Dr. Harold Fernandez is a cardiac surgeon, a graduate of Princeton and Harvard Medical School affiliated with St. Francis Hospital on Long Island, one of the nation’s finest heart surgery centers. But most of the patients who receive the bypasses and valve replacements he performs do not know that more than 30 years ago, on a moonless October night, their surgeon was a frightened boy of 13 standing with his younger brother on a tiny island in the Bahamas waiting for a flimsy motorboat to smuggle them and a dozen other Colombians across the treacherous waters of the Bermuda Triangle to the coast of Florida. His parents were desperate that he make that journey, not just because they wanted him to rejoin them but because they wanted to take him out of the violent and drug-infested streets of Medellín, the world’s cocaine capital, where his friends were succumbing to drugs and bullets. But they also knew that what he would be getting for his efforts was the chance to be another illegal alien in a country where illegal aliens are despised and abused, and where they fear that every day will be their last in America. ILLEGAL ALIEN  is a memoir of Harold Fernandez’s trials and tribulations; as a boy who took that breathtaking journey and leaped hurdles of language, schooling and murky immigration status to get to where he is today. Written with award-winning New York Times journalist Joseph Berger, his inspirational odyssey will make us think in new ways about what we miss by not capitalizing on the potential of this nation’s 12 million illegal immigrants.

In the late ‘90s, young MBAs, with their slicked-back hair and unlined faces, told veteran financial analyst Michael Farr with considerable impatience that he just didn’t get new “concept” companies. They told him there was a new paradigm; that earnings per share and book values didn’t matter anymore. New companies are valued on “clicks” and “number of eyeballs” and site visits, they said. And the hell of it was, they seemed to understand something that Farr didn’t. The market seemed to understand it too, as it swept share prices skyward for companies with no earnings or prospect of earnings. As the profits climbed, trust in common sense faded. Farr thought that maybe he was as ignorant as the young analysts thought, because while he still didn’t understand it, they were making a ton of money. That is…until the bubble burst. In THE ARROGANCE CYCLE, Michael Farr will explain the way in which arrogance affects the market. As market bubbles build, so does the arrogance level of buyers and sellers and it becomes palpable as markets near bursting points. Investors who are baffled and skeptical of the exciting, new hype allow themselves to be cleaved from their common sense and carried away by promises of fast money. The cycle plays out, money is lost, and we have only ourselves to blame. With eye-opening insight and straightforward advice THE ARROGANCE CYCLE will teach investors how to steer clear of this quagmire once and for all.

On a spring day in Florence, Italy, 25 years ago, Dennis Hegyi, an American physics professor on sabbatical from the University of Michigan, tasted gelato so remarkable that he knew he had to learn to make it himself. His goal was to reproduce gelato at home equal to the best available in Italy. He could find no cookbooks in English that explained how to make it using current Italian techniques, and so Hegyi started the first of many experiments. His efforts, while tasty, were not quite right. Undaunted, he kept trying. Years later while traveling in Italy along a delicious trail stretching between gelateries, Hegyi was introduced to Gian Paolo Valli, a gelato consultant who also taught master classes. After a brief, lively discussion, the two decided to write a book together. Now that Hegyi and Valli have discovered the secret to producing luscious, luxurious gelato in American kitchens, the two educators, with complementary backgrounds, are eager to share their recipes and techniques for great gelato with the American public. In AUTHENTIC GELATO ITALIANO, written with celebrated food writer Mary Goodbody, they will offer a definitive guide to making world-class gelato.

Harmony Millset is 17 years old and has already lost all but one family member to sickness, accident, and other unforeseen providences in the harshness that is New England’s Plymouth Colony.  Reluctant to leave her beloved settlement, the only home she has ever known, she nonetheless accompanies her aged grandfather to the Spanish-held Florida colonies as a missionary. Unscrupulous ship captains and storms at sea throw Harmony into the path of wicked, half-Spanish pirate, Captain Marcos delRio. Despite a traumatic first encounter and the pirate’s fearsome reputation, sparks fly between Harmony and the Captain. When her grandfather is kidnapped by pirates, to whom can Harmony turn for help except her Sovereign Lord—and Captain delRio himself? Can love between a Puritan and a pirate ever flourish? An intoxicating read from beginning to end, THE PURITAN AND THE PIRATE by author and poet Sarah Ashwood is an exhilarating and swooningly romantic tale of betrayal, forgiveness, faith, and redemption on the high seas.

The neon-streaked, bass-thumping, cosmopolitan Miami you know and love today emerged from the multichromatic ooze of a hotel and club called The Mutiny. From the mid ‘70s to its early 1984 peak, this infamous Coconut Grove landmark was the epicenter of Miami’s underworld, a glitzy, cocaine-coated headquarters for everyone from kingpins to gun-runners, spies, mercenaries, assassins, fraudsters and coked-out movie stars; money launderers, anti-Castro zealots, corrupt city politicians and their mistresses, and, of course, all manner of undercover FBI, DEA, IRS and police agents, and their crisscrossing networks of wired informants. Oh, and a staff who were often tipped in Styrofoam cups packed with cocaine. Coated in legend, intrigue and Dom Pérignon (by 1980, it was the planet’s #1 consumer), The Mutiny was an unprecedented ecosystem for the surreal time and place that was the Miami of 30 years ago. Though the hotel fell victim to the Savings & Loan crisis, its ghosts still haunt (and, in fact, walk the streets of) south Florida. In MUTINY IN MIAMI, BusinessWeek senior writer and native Miamian Roben Farzad tracks down and profiles The Mutiny’s colorful heyday habitués and their dark arts—a journey that takes him to early bird dinner specials with aging drug lords; frank tell-alls with fashionistas who were really government agents; and instructive fishing trips with smugglers. A thrilling piece of investigative journalism, it will capture the spirit of a lawless, exhilarating and dangerous time and explore what happens when the fun stops.

In Blade Runner, synthetic humans shopped seedy storefronts for new body parts. In an apartment in San Francisco this past Christmas, a self-taught bioengineer spliced genes at her kitchen table. Meredith Patterson is not making a replicant, at least not yet. But her home lab feels like the place where, centuries from now, a computer-human hybrid might look back and say, “That’s where it all began.” Patterson, who programs databases by day, is one of a small but growing group of high-tech tinkerers who have moved beyond silicon and software to the building blocks of life itself. Using homemade lab equipment and sharing know-how through online social networks, these self-proclaimed biohackers are gleefully working to democratize DNA. Apple computers were invented in a garage, they point out. Same with the Google search engine. When wet labs become as common as home workshops, biohackers say, the cure for cancer cannot be far behind. In BIOPUNKS, Associated Press biotech reporter Marcus Wohlsen follows a crew of scientific outsiders as they work to upend the scientific establishment and bring gene-splicing to the masses. Forged in the open-source software movement, biohackers believe more knowledge in more hands means more discoveries. Though they have only just begun, the outcry is already intense. Biotech professionals and anti-genetic engineering activists alike warn that bumbling hobbyists could unleash medical or environmental disasters. Biohackers like to predict that creating new life forms from scratch will soon be as easy as programming a computer. The difference: The viruses in biohackers’ kitchens are real. (Please note that Michael Bourret is the agent on this project.)

Cheating is the ultimate of all betrayals. At its worst, it feels like a death.  While you may eventually be able to forgive, it is impossible to forget. And yet, like the death of a loved one, in time you begin living your life again. How does pioneering entertainment journalist Rona Barrett know this? Because she’s been there.  Her husband’s affair almost permanently ended a 10 ½ year marriage, but they stuck it out, got back together, and the last 14 years of their marriage before he passed away were the best of their lives.  In that process, Rona discovered the keys to making a marriage work from the beginning and after a betrayal.  In THE MARRIAGE CABINET: SURVIVING INFIDELITY AND BUILDING A LASTING RELATIONSHIP, Rona teaches readers that marriages require taking an inventory of yourself and your marriage to determine which factors—including sex, compatibility, trust, security, career, and family—are most important to making your own relationship work.  By learning to prioritize and compromise couples can create marriages that will face down life’s obstacles.  Rona’s autobiography, Miss Rona, was a #1 bestseller, and for more than 30 years, she covered every aspect of show business as the premier reporter of the entertainment industry.  In THE MARRIAGE CABINET, she brings her fascination with people and winning personality to bear on the struggles so many of us face to make marriage work.  (Please note that Lauren Abramo is the agent on this project.)

RIGHTS ROUNDUP:

Portuguese rights for Jacqueline Carey’s KUSHIEL’S DART, KUSHIEL’S CHOSEN and KUSHIEL’S AVATAR sold to Saida de Emergencia. Italian rights for KUSHIEL’S SCION went to Nord and Italian mass market rights for KUSHIEL’S AVATAR were purchased by TEA. William McKeen’s OUTLAW JOURNALIST will be published in French by Tristram. Polish publisher Albatros bought David Morrell’s THE SHIMMER. Generights/Alpress will publish the book in the Czech Republic. Richelle Mead’s VAMPIRE ACADEMY sold to Nova Fronteira of Brazil. Russian publisher Exmo picked up FROSTBITE and SHADOW KISS, the next two in the series. Rights to all three titles were sold to French publisher Bragelonne; Artemis will publish the Turkish editions; Arteplural/Bertrand picked up Portuguese rights; and Geuldam Publishing bought Korean rights.  Romanian rights to ONE LAST TIME by John Edward sold to Adevar. Mondadori will publish the Italian edition of Jack Kilborn’s AFRAID. FRANKENSTEIN by Susan Tyler Hitchcock will be published in Brazil by Larousse. AJ Hartley’s WHAT TIME DEVOURS will be published in the Netherlands by Karakter. Danish audio rights to Hartley’s THE MASK OF ATREUS sold to Audioteket.

Audio rights to Tilar Mazzeo’s THE WIDOW CLIQUOT sold to Tantor. Brilliance will publish the audio edition of David Morrell’s THE SHIMMER. Listening Library took audio rights to James Dashner’s THE MAZE RUNNER. And audio rights for A RAINBOW IN THE NIGHT by Dominique Lapierre were purchased by Blackstone Audio. HighBridge Audio bought Rhoda Janzen’s MENNONITE IN A LITTLE BLACK DRESS. Tantor Media will publish audio editions of Jacqueline Carey’s next Kushiel trilogy beginning with NAAMAH’S KISS, and her new novel SANTA OLIVIA.

RECENT SALES:

Erica Ridley’s Regency romance novel TOUCHED was sold to John Scognamiglio at Kensington as part of a two book World rights deal by Lauren Abramo.

World rights to THE BRIDGES AT SAMDONG-NI by David Sears sold to Bob Pigeon at Da Capo by Jim McCarthy.

Lauren Abramo sold World rights to Gord Rollo’s STRANGE MAGIC and VALLEY OF THE SCARECROW to Don D’Auria at Dorchester.

Jessica Papin sold World English rights (except India) for A RAINBOW IN THE NIGHT by Dominque Lapierre to Bob Pigeon at Da Capo. The author retains translation rights.

Deb Werksman at Sourcebooks purchased World rights to Abigail Reynold’s MR. FITZWILLIAM DARCY: THE LAST MAN IN THE WORLD, the second book in the Pemberley Variations series, from Lauren Abramo.

WHEN THE JUNGLE WAS A WOMAN by Lawrence Abbott, about pioneering travel writer Jane Dollinger, sold to Brigitte Shull at Palgrave in a World rights deal.

World English rights for Diane Fanning’s two new as-yet-untitled novels in the Lucinda Pierce series went to Anna Telfer at Severn House.

THE BUTTONED UP HANDBOOK by Alicia Rockmore and Sarah Welch sold to Krista Lyons-Gould at Seal Press. The authors retain British and translation rights.

Charlie Spicer at St. Martin’s Press acquired North American rights to Amber Hunt’s as-yet-untitled true crime book about the murder of Barbara George, allegedly by her husband Michael George.

Krista Lyons-Gould at Seal Press purchased Pesi Dinnerstein’s THE KABBALAH OF CLUTTER, which chronicles the author’s search for an orderly life. The authors retain British and translation rights.

Michael Bourret sold the fifth book in Heather Brewer’s Chronicles of Vladimir Tod series to Maureen Sullivan at Dutton Children’s Books. The author retains British and translation rights.

LIFE GETS BETTER by Wendy Lustbader, a forerunner of the positive aging movement, went to Mitch Horowitz at Tarcher in a World rights deal.

Jennifer Klonsky at Simon Pluse bought World rights to CRYER’S CROSS by Lisa McMann from Michael Bourret.

Jim McCarthy sold World English rights to the sixth book in the Vampire Academy series, as well as an additional six book series by Richelle Mead to Jessica Rothenberg at Razorbill.

The next two young adult novels in James Dashner’s Maze Runner series went to Krista Marino at Delacorte in a North American rights deal by Michael Bourret.

Michael Bourret sold World rights to BEHIND THE BAR and an as-yet-untitled collection of poems on drinking by A.J. Rathbun to Valerie Cimino at Harvard Common Press.

Chris Shoebinger at Shadow Mountain purchased the second book in the 13th Reality Book series by James Dashner in a World rights deal by Michael Bourret.

World rights to THE TERRIFIED BAKER by executive pastry chef Emily Luchetti with Lisa Weiss went to Michael Sand at Little, Brown.

PARADISE AND HIS SMOKIN’ SQUEEZEBOX, a young adult novel by Jill Alexander, was sold by Michael Bourret to Liz Szabla at Feiwel & Friends. The author retains British and translation rights.

Marcia Markland at Thomas Dunne Books bought HOTHOUSE, the full story of Farrar, Straus and Giroux, by Boris Kachka in a North American rights deal.

Lauren Abramo sold North American rights to AMIDO BLACK by Jes Battis, the third book in the OSI series, as well as the fourth as-yet-untitled book in the series to Ginjer Buchanan at Berkley.

THE PROFILER by Pat Brown with Bob Andelman went to Barbara Jones at Hyperion in a World rights deal.

World rights to THE DEER WATCH, a new picture book by Pat Lowery Collins, sold to Hilary Van Dusen at Candlewick by Lauren Abramo.

YIELD, a novel by Lee Houck, sold to Peter Senftleben at Kensington in a World rights deal by Jim McCarthy.

Jean Lucas at Andrews McMeel purchased World rights to THE GOOD NEIGHBOR COOKBOOK by Sara Quessenberry and Suzanne Schlosberg.

True crime writer Carlton Smith’s new book on the murder of a wealthy dentist by his soon-to-be ex-wife’s state trooper boyfriend was sold to Charlie Spicer at St. Martin’s Press. The author retains British and translation rights.

TIMECASTER by Joe Kimball sold to Ginjer Buchanan at Berkley as part of a two book North American rights deal.

Doug Lansky’s THE TITANIC AWARDS went to Meg Leder at Perigee in a World rights deal by Michael Bourret.

North American rights were sold to Charlie Spicer at St. Martin’s Press for Michael Fleeman’s new true crime book about Michele Lanahan, an Alaskan woman who killed her fiance for his million dollar life insurance policy.

Jim McCarthy sold World rights for the next two books in the Eugenie Markham series by Richelle Mead to John Scognamiglio at Kensington.