Category Archives: characters

4

Life (or writing) lessons from Stephen King

Who doesn’t like to take advice from a master? I’d say Stephen King falls into that category. Despite a terrible accident which almost caused him to retire from writing in 2002, King has produced a staggering number of books, including classics like Carrie, The Shining, Misery, and the list goes on. No one does it better, and there have been few that have managed to compete with his mastery of prose and plot. His category of fiction should just bear his namesake!

He’s offered much advice to many over the years, and his 2000 memoir/writing guide called On Writing is widely admired. This recent piece from openculture.com shines a light on King’s top 20 pieces of advice for writers, and it’s worth taking a fresh look at how to implement them in your writing process today.

His advice is so straightforward, and some of it is really simple. One wouldn’t necessarily think that turning off the tv would be a tip that Stephen King would consider in his top 20, but it speaks to the larger issue of a distracted culture and the need to pay attention to the task at hand. It reminds me of my parents always telling me to turn off the tv when I was doing homework as a kid. They had a point, even if I didn’t want to hear it at the time.

The suggestion to finish a draft within 3 months is also interesting. It’s like he’s in your ear screaming “Stop procrastinating!”.

And there are inspiring tips for writing here that are entirely applicable to life in general, so this list does not solely apply to writers and writing. A few to ponder: Don’t worry about making people happy (a ubiquitous but smart piece of advice that my client Amy Morin talks about in her piece “13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t Do”), The magic is in you, Stick to your own style, and Take a break. Good thoughts for writing and life. Enjoy!

0

Last-minute Halloween costume ideas

October 31st is two days away. That means some of you have two days to put together a costume—I know can’t be the only one who consistently improvises with his costume at the last second. (By the way, I was a pirate clown this past weekend. My character had a very intricate back-story, but maybe that’s a story for another time.)

Be a character from one of your favorite books. The written word has inspired many a Halloween costume, and this year is no different. I mean, it may even be trendy—in some circles. Check out this “How to Pick Your Literary Halloween Costume” guide if you need some help preparing for this Hallow’s Eve:

http://www.bookish.com/articles/the-best-halloween-costumes-from-books

 

If you’re in relationship and want to be obnoxious about it, here’s your cosume:

The Cat in the Hat by Dr. Seuss

 

If you want to be spooky and don’t want to mess with the classics:

Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

 

For the rambunctious, wild child out there—who also happens to be into classic lit: