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The name game

There’s nothing quite like starting off a new season with a book sale, particularly in Autumn, when the summer’s lethargy fades and it feels like everyone in publishing is back on the hunt for new work. And happily enough, I was able to place a middle grade novel that I absolutely loved, made even more gratifying by the fact that, full disclosure, it took quite a while to find its home. But back-patting aside, I wanted to share this story because it speaks to the importance of a really good title.

So, the first time I sent the novel around, it had what I thought was a snappy title—two words that rhymed, which seemed quirky and fun, plus it came from a line in the book, which is always a good thing. Yet, on the first round, despite some enthusiastic reports and near misses, we didn’t end up with a sale. And after enough passes, for which a lot of editors said the same thing, the author and I decided to table the novel for now and work on something new.

But then, a few months after we put it aside, the author came back to me and asked if we could try again with a new title. He just had a feeling that the original title wasn’t quite representing the substance and tenor of the book. Instead, he suggested a three-word phrase that was much more literary and ambiguous, though still taken from a line in the book. So, we gave it another shot, and lo and behold, the offer came in about a month later!

Now, there could certainly be many other variables here at play—the timing of the submission, not finding the right editor until late in the game, the holes in the editor’s list, etc. But I do think that the new title reframed readers’ expectations about what was inside and put them in a different mindset when reading it. Yes, titles can be a struggle, and since publishers almost always contractually control the title, the struggle can seem counterproductive at times. But I hope this story shows how important it is to find a title that truly reflects the book—and at the same time, if the title isn’t quite working but the content’s there, a title change just might be what the doctor ordered…

One Response to The name game

  1. So now I wonder: if you have two pretty good titles for your manuscript, but with vastly different tones, should you offer both when you query? Perhaps in the final paragraph? Certainly once someone is a client they would share this and the agent could make the call for submitting to editors, but would just confuse the issue when shopping for an agent?

    And while we’re talking titles, let me ask this as well: Let’s say you have significantly revised a manuscript, almost to the point where it’s a new novel. (Story changes, POV, the whole banana.) (This one’s not me, by the way.) Six months or a year later, with a new title, do you think it’s okay to re-query agents who passed on the query the first go-round? This is assuming these are agents who asked for pages with the query.

    Thanks! And congratulations to you both!

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