Why some authors hate publishers

A long-time client, who is very dear to our agency, pointed us in the direction of a piece by Michael Levin in the HuffPost that I’d missed when it ran last week.  Our client was distressed by Mr. Levin’s assertions about the nefarious tactics mustache twirling publishers use to victimize authors.  Understandably, since Mr. Levin writes with such passion and seeming authority, she was concerned that the picture he paints is an accurate depiction of the culture of book publishing as 2012 draws to a close and we count down to the  Mayan apocalypse (which, of course, if it comes to pass will make this discussion irrelevant).

After reading the piece Jane and I had basically the same reaction which boiled down to “Why do the people talking trash about our business always seem to be the ones who understand it the least or who have a bag full of sour grapes they’re carrying around with them?”  And, then I got all happy because I didn’t have to scrounge around looking for a blog topic this week.

We promised our client that we’d go through Mr. Levin’s arguments and respond to them from our point of view and this, more or less (with my usual digressions and irritating asides), is what I hope to do here.

Mr. Levin’s argument boils down to four salient points:  (1) Publishers hate authors even though authors and the work they produce are their lifeblood. (2) Publishers are reducing advances and royalties across the board with the added perk of also reducing marketing and promotion for their titles. (3) Publishers’ dependence on BookScan (the tracking system for sales) guarantees that unless an author has a boffo success, their career is over faster than you can say “reserve for returns.”  And (4) by lowering the quality of the product because they refuse to pay what good authors are worth, publishers are ensuring that the public stops buying books and turns to other sources (the Internet) for their information and entertainment kicks.

Alrighty, then!  This should be quick(ish).

(1)   Publishers are the partners and adversaries of agents.  We work with and against them for the good of our authors, who have our first allegiance.  That said, most publishers (and the term includes all the people who make books happen at a publishing house from the CEO to the intern who opens the mail) we deal with daily, sometimes hourly, are incredibly hard working, thoughtful, engaged, and compassionate.  I’ve said this before and it bears repeating, very few people go into our business to achieve their dreams of Trump-like wealth.  Salaries are low in publishing compared to those in other media, and the work is painstaking and, often thankless (Exhibit A: Mr. Levin).  Publishing types do their jobs—which entail long hours after they’ve left the office sitting with a manuscript that needs to be shaped on a granular level—because they LOVE books.  Period.  With all the challenges publishers are faced with in this increasingly digital world, the level of care they bring to the curating of great (and even not so great) books is impressive.

(2)  Not sure which publishers Mr. Levin is talking about but our agency has had its best year ever.  We’ve sold over 100 books this year and have been paid advances, ranging from five to seven figures, on every one of them.  Perhaps there are some tiny houses that are embracing the “no advance” model but we work with the Big Six as well as many, many smaller independent publishers and have not seen this no-advance/lower-royalty model Mr. Levin describes.

(3)  We depend on BookScan too when we are considering signing up an author.  It’s a tremendous tool that lets you know what you’re up against when trying to find a new home for a previously published author whose book didn’t do well.  Has BookScan ever been a deciding factor in not signing up a book?  Probably, but only if we were very much on the fence about it anyway.  I’d venture to say that this is the same process publishers go through because we’ve had numerous authors whose BookScan sales, how to put it delicately?, were in the toilet and we still sold their next book and the book after that.  Bottom line, if your next idea is great or your genius undeniable, or your platform has reached critical mass, BookScan will not destroy your career.

(4)  Really?  Take a look at the best books of the year lists that are cropping up all over the place right now and tell me if you think important, brilliant, exciting fiction and non-fiction isn’t being published any more.  And, given the fact that book sales have risen in the digital age, it seems that a new generation of readers is turning to…books…for their information and their entertainment kicks!

Seems to me that publishers don’t hate authors any more than authors hate publishers.  In this complicated new world we live in, we all (on both sides of the business) need to take responsibility for our own failures and flaws as well as advocate for our strengths and successes rather than succumbing to paranoid fantasies about how much “they” hate us.

3 Responses to Why some authors hate publishers

  1. EDWARD says:

    It’s always “the other guy”. When the cashier at the supermarket gives me the wrong change, “she’s cheating me”. When a driver cuts me off, “he’s driving as if he were in his own country”. Anybody who thinks they can solve the world’s ills better than I is a candidate for “poorly educated”. More recently, if people think the world’s problems should be solved differently than I do, “it’s those Republicans”. If you disagree with any of this, “that’s proof you’re stupid”.
    My own myopia is sometimes hard to see because I’m the thing in need of repair trying to do the seeing. I think “hate” is a strong word, also a bit juvenile. I don’t want to get into a mudslinging contest, though, with the allegedly besmirched author. What kind of story do we actually have if you vacuum out all the melodrama? I think we have a guy who could improve the world a little by quietly changing agents, changing publishers, or changing professions. But quietly. The operative word here quietly. I’m trying to read.

  2. Kevin A. Lewis says:

    Like any large corporation, publishers are going to have a bottom-line agenda which varys greatly according to who’s got the reins of power inside.Just like some retail outfits that spend a lot on advertising but keep store staff down to 25% of requirements and then moan about massive shoplifting while handing out big bonuses to top execs. Publishers don’t “hate” anybody; certain corporate players might have a totally disengaged attitude toward the book business while they’re gaming their way to the top, but you find that everywhere. I think they’re insulated enough that it’s wise to have a snappy agent, (and I definitely keep a “flake list” among this latter species to avoid spending my resources on poseurs and high-profile scene surfers who never seem to get around to selling any actual books) and when I hook up with one, I’ll use all the black magic at my disposal to help her get around the deadwood. By the way, I’m pleasantly surprised to see you’re posting; I thought everyone would have fled town till next week at the earliest…

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